Russian Guild of Film Critics 100 | 1930-1939

My entry into professional writing was reviewing the American Film Institute’s “100 Years…100 Movies” list for DigBoston. Now I’m doing the same with the Russian Guild of Film Critics’ equivalent list found here. Rather than review each film, I’ll be recapping each decade.

I’ll also include the burrito I ate while collecting my thoughts. Welcome to BurritoAndAMovie.com.

Films:
Road to Life (Путёвка в жизнь) 1931, dir. Nikolai Ekk (YouTube)
Outskirts (Окраина) 1933, dir. Boris Barnet (Kanopy)
Chapaev (Чапаев) 1934, dir. Sergei Vasliev, Georgi Vasiliev (YouTube)
A Severe Young Man (Строгий юноша) 1934, dir. Abram Room (Wikimedia)
Jolly Fellows (Весёлые ребята) 1934, dir. Grigori Aleksandrov (YouTube)
The Youth of Maxim (Юность Максима) 1935, dir. Grigori Kozintsev, Leonid Trauberg (YouTube)
Happiness (Счастье) 1935, dir. Aleksandr Medvedkin (Kanopy)
Alexander Nevsky (Александр Невский) 1938, dir. Sergei Eisenstein (YouTube)

Burrito (last one pre-isolation):
Steak Burrito Grande, Herrera’s, Boston, MA


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Kristofer Jenson’s 2019 BOFCA Ballot

There’s a lot to love about the way we in the Boston Online Film Critics Association choose our annual BOFCA Award winners. Ranked voting (which, ahem, would be one positive step toward fixing democracy), a Top 10 list where beloved non-winners still get represented, and the satisfaction of boosting what we all know should win (e.g. You Were Never Really Here) instead of what we all know will win (that other movie).

To see this year’s winners, click here. Here’s my 2019 Boston Online Film Critics Awards ballot.

Burrito: Steak burrito grande, Felipe’s, Cambridge, MA (2019, dir. J.J. Abrams)

BEST PICTURE

1 – THE NIGHTINGALE*
2 – PARASITE
3 – LITTLE WOMEN
4 – ONCE UPON A TIME… IN HOLLYWOOD
5 – UNCUT GEMS
6 – US
7 – THE FAREWELL
8 – THE IRISHMAN
9 – MIDSOMMAR
10 – IN FABRIC

Continue reading “Kristofer Jenson’s 2019 BOFCA Ballot”

Russian Guild of Film Critics 100 | 1917-1929

My entry into professional writing was reviewing the American Film Institute’s “100 Years…100 Movies” list for DigBoston. Now I’m doing the same with the Russian Guild of Film Critics’ equivalent list found here. Rather than review each film, I’ll be recapping each decade.

I’ll also include the burrito I ate while collecting my thoughts. Welcome to BurritoAndAMovie.com.

Films:
Father Sergius (Отец Сергий) 1917-1918, dir. Alexandre Volkoff, Yakov Protazanov (YouTube)
Strike (Стачка) 1925, dir. Sergei Eisenstein (Kanopy)
Battleship Potemkin (Броненосец Потёмкин) 1925, dir. Sergei Eisenstein (Kanopy)
By the Law (По закону) 1926, dir. Lev Kuleshov (Kanopy)
The Overcoat (Шинель) 1926, dir. Leonid Trauberg, Grigori Kozintsev (YouTube)
Bed and Sofa (Третья мещанская) 1927, dir. Abram Room (Kanopy)
The House on Trubnaya (Дом на Трубной) 1928, dir. Boris Barnet (Kanopy)
Storm Over Asia (Потомок Чингисхана) 1928, dir. Vsevolod Pudovkin (Kanopy)
Fragment of an Empire (Обломок империи) 1929, dir. Fridrikh Ermler (YouTube)

Burrito:
Carne Asada, Tenoch, Somerville, MA


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The Burrito Theory of Film

Some of my favorite Boston movie memories are intrinsically tied to the warm comfort of a great burrito. To wash down the weirdness of the Boston Underground Film Festival at Brattle Theatre, pop over to Felipe’s. For endurance food during Independent Film Festival Boston at Somerville Theatre, stop by Tenoch. To revive yourself after the Coolidge Corner Theatre Halloween marathon, there’s no better choice than Anna’s – either of them!

Which is the more remarkable thing: that there are so many great theaters in town, that our burrito spots are consistently top-notch, or that the two always seem to be right next to each other?

Editors aren’t usually interested in what you ate after you watch a movie, but dammit I really want to share that experience too. So here’s the basic idea of the site:

  • I watch a movie
  • I eat a burrito during or after
  • I write about the movie
  • I show and describe the burrito

Movies Are Burritos

There is nothing in a burrito that you can’t find in dozens of other dishes. But wrapping them all up in a single tortilla, forcing them to coexist and work as one unit transforms it into more than the some of its parts. So it is with film: there are wholly distinct modes of art that work exclusively with visual, sound, and story, but creating a film means harnessing all three in a coherent way that makes sense to the viewer. The projector is the tortilla and the screen is the mouth. The audience’s eyes are the mouths, the screen is the tortilla, the projector is the tin foil, the film is the ingredients. Yeah, we’ll go with that.

Anyway, enjoy.